Wild Herb Days Coming Soon

This summer, when we were planning our two Wild Herb Weeks, many people asked for more one-day programs. We listened, and now we’re planning several Wild Herb Days for the coming year. Wild Herb Days will include plant walks and various other herbal activities, such as tincture making, salve making, syrup making, spa treatments and product making, making and eating wild herbal salads and soups, and making and drinking wild herbal beverages, and herbal gift making.

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Many hands preparing sumacade.

We’ll start off the season on Sept. 18 with a weed walk and tincture making. Exactly what we’ll do depends on the plants, but likely activities include making and drinking sumacade, making goldenrod tincture, and making burdock tincture.  If we have time, we may also make a salad.

In November, we’ll do herbal gift making. You’ll go home with four or five lovely herbal gifts, including at least one herbal vinegar, herbal shampoo and soap, and an herbal dream pillow.

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Everyone loves the herbal beverages.

One of our traditions at both Wild Herb Week and Wild Herb Day is to make delicious herbal beverages whenever we can. In the winter, we’ll be making warming drinks to nurture ourselves while we have our herbal spa day and make syrups and salves.

In the spring, we’ll explore the new growth and prepare food and medicine from what comes up. Most likely, this will include a spring salad and a celebration of nettle, manifest in soup and nourishing nettle vinegar.

 

Click here for more details about Wild Herb Days.

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Autumn olives.

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A Wild Herb Week student with her goldenrod harvest.

 

 

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Herbal tinctures and oils.

 

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Baskets made by participants in Wild Herb Week I, July 2015, filled with herbs we gathered for making tinctures and medicinal oils.

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“It’s Gone!” she said.

“It’s gone,” she said.

We were nearing the middle of a session combining coaching with shiatsu, qigong, and herbal counseling. In this particular session, most of our work was shiatsu and coaching, and she had started giving me some more details about a problem she wanted to share when suddenly the rest flew out of her mind.

“Shall we just wait a minute?”

“No, I can tell by the way it happened that it’s gone for a while, like, maybe a few days.”

“Would you like me to help you with that? We can use a qi projection technique I’ve developed working with people after concussions.”

“Sure. Why not?” she replied, open but slightly skeptical. Skeptical but open is a good combination.

“Oh,  so here’s what I was going to say….” And there it was, seconds after I began the projection, in greater detail than originally.

“That was pretty cool,” she said.

Languages heal the brain

I was delighted to see this article confirming that bilingualism aids in recovery from stroke, because it corresponds to my experience working with people recovering from concussions. Granted, concussions differ greatly from stroke, but both affect memory.

When I work with people recovering from concussions, I use a complex approach including herbs; shiatsu; specific acupoints for headaches, nausea, and other symptoms; and outgoing qigong, also known as qi projection. I often combine mental challenges with qi projection.

The client and I choose the mental challenge together, but it often involves language. Sometimes it’s rapid-fire transitions among languages, or telling a story – usually one that teases the memory in its own right, such as a minor  conversation from three days ago; or a description of a scene from a five days back that includes details about smells, sounds, textures, and colors as well as conversation – and translating the story into at least one other language. The qi projection makes it easier for the client to remember both the details of the story and recalcitrant words.

Since I am a linguist and a philologist as well as an herbalist  and shiatsu and qigong therapist, I particularly relish the opportunity to bring languages into healing. Fortunately, it turns out to be a very effective combination. In the future I may even combine language instruction with healing work.